Archive

Archive and Photo Gallery taken from our old website:   http://vcn.bc.ca/pmes/Fish%20Habitat%20Restoration.htm

Ecological Studies Research Initiatives

Noon’s Creek Downstream from Hatchery Noon’s Creek Salmon Pond
Noon’s Creek Upstream from Hatchery Noon’s Creek Duck Pond

A summary of the data from water testing is in this table. WATER TEST

To reach us:

Port Moody Ecological Society
300, Ioco Road Port Moody, British Columbia, Canada V3H 2V7
Phone and fax: (604) 469-9106

These pictures has been taken during the summer of 2001, when the hatchery had just opened.  Much of the work was done by hand by volunteers.

Hatchery Rearing PondOn left, coho over-wintering pond under predator net and outdoor classroom in background.  Note hand-built fish viewing & feeding platform and guard rails.  Over-wintering pond has about 23,000 coho salmon fry in it now.  Predator net tries to prevents too many free meals for:  Belted kingfishers; green-backed herons, great blue herons, Northwestern crows, various gulls species, Hooded and Common mergansers, raccoons, river otters and coyotes, among other fish predators. Outdoor classroom is one of two built in 1995 on the Noons Creek hatchery site.  In the fall of 2001, roughly 1,374 elementary & middle school students in grades 1 to 7, from about 30 elementary & middle schools from Coquitlam School District # 43 participated in one of three PMES courses offered.  The fall 2001 PMES schools program also involved 49 teachers and about 274 parents and/or guardians (drivers).

Below, concrete and wood weir.  Part of series of weirs, overhangs, channels and pools in a complex of about 100 meters of new off-channel hand-built restored and enhanced fish habitat , constructed over the last five years on the Noons Creek hatchery site by a highly focused ‘crew’ of volunteers at little or no cost.

Wooden log weir and channel. Over-wintering pond outflow channel looking upstream toward overwintering pond. Note density of healthy riparian vegetation, composed mostly of native plants. Ideal fish habitat.

Hand-built concrete and wood weir.  Part of newly created off-channel fish habitat on Noons Creek hatchery site.Please note:  Looking upstream on left hand side, hand-built overhang/bench with plant growth on top.  This was third section of hand-built off-channel fish habitat restored and enhanced by an extraordinary volunteer crew over the past five years.

Below, a pool with some small root wads for woody debris.  Part of newly hand-built off-channel fish habitat on Noons Creek hatchery site.  Note wooden weir with circular opening at far end of pool, and fish friendly features, such as, overhangs/benches on right hand side of pool (fish resting and hiding places) with plant growth on top.  Circular opening in weir is for a fish trap, installed in spring each year to enable daily trapping and counting of out-migrating fry and smolts from this new off-channel habitat to determine usage and effectiveness of new habitat.

This was the first in the series of pools and weirs and channels built by-hand by a dedicated ‘crew’ of volunteers in 1996.  A excellent example of what can be done to restore and enhance off-channel fish habitat, now extremely rare in urban watersheds, by volunteers with little or no money.  Please note:  in distant background, the railing for a fish viewing area, newly installed by the City of Port Moody.  This fish viewing area is on a new section of the Trans-Canada Trail looking towards the Noons Creek hatchery site and fish spawning in Noons Creek.  The Noons Creek hatchery site is located in the City of Port Moody Shoreline Park, apparently visited by 750,000 people each year.

Weir – Part of Noons Creek EnhancementOn left, close-up of wooden log weir for previous photo.
On right, Noons Creek after a healthy fall rainfall, looking downstream from over-wintering pond outflow channel confluence.  Usually on the left hand side at the bend is the preferred feeding location of a Great blue heron.  This is prime spawning habitat for both chum and coho salmon.  Cutthroat trout are also ever-present here too.  Hand-built in-stream fish friendly features are below water.  Additional weirs and specially selected spawning gravel will be added to compensate for lack of natural downstream gravel recruitment and to improve spawning opportunities.

Our goals in 2001

Fish Habitat Restoration

Off-channel Fish Habitat

 

Additional off-channel fish habitat building is currently being continued by hand on the Noons Creek hatchery site.
Eric and Co.’s work serves as a practical demonstration of what can be done by volunteers, at no-cost/low-cost to effectively restore and enhance off-channel fish habitat in a heavily-impacted urbanized stream. Eric’s fry and smolt trap counts from the hand-built off-channel fish habitat, so far this year and for last year, are encouraging. About 3,500 coho fry and 152 coho smolts emerged from the hand-built off-channel habitat last spring (2000) and were trapped, and then counted and recorded each morning by Eric.  Eric’s coho fry trap count this year, was over 3,600.

 

Fish Habitat Restoration Project

 

Matt Foy (Biologist, Resource Restoration) and Mike Landiak P.Eng, (Project Supervisor) , both from for Fisheries & Oceans Canada, Salmon and Habitat Enhancement Branch, on August 16, 2001, completed a fish habitat restoration project, mostly to benefit chum spawners, during the 2001 fisheries window, in the main-stem of Noons Creek immediately downstream from the Ioco Road bridge.

 

Some fish habitat restoration and enhancement projects, in Noons Creek watershed and in other nearby streams are now being funded through court awards and through donations, like the Labatt’s donation of $3,000.00 received by PMES two years ago.

 

Broadly-based community partnerships are essential to completing fish habitat restoration projects.   All planned and undertaken fish habitat restoration and enhancement projects are done by PMES volunteers in conjunction with community partners. Community partners wishing to work with Port Moody Ecological Society volunteers on fish habitat restoration and enhancement projects are welcome and encouraged. Community partners and volunteers working on each PMES sponsored fish habitat restoration and enhancement project will be acknowledged and recognized on this web site and in “The Creek Crier”

 

A list of the other possible and/or potential fish habitat restoration projects in the Noons Creek and West Noons Creek watersheds:

 

These include, among others, the following:

Removal of or back watering old steel pipe culverts at Noons Creek and West Noons Creek, and possibly Mossom Creek too, along the BC Hydro Right-of-Way Service Road and replacement with low-cost / no-cost and more fish friendly structures;
Removal of or diversion around an old rotting wooden coffer dam in Noons Creek immediately downstream of Noons Creek Park, in Coquitlam;
Fixing a dysfunctional bio-remediation marsh immediately upstream from Panorama Drive draining into Noons Creek, in Coquitlam;
Investigating and finding a remedy for the unmarked pipe allowing unknown effluent into the high-water side of the culvert under Panorama Drive at Noons Creek in Coquitlam;
Installing stream awareness signs at Noons Creek and Diamond Crescent, in Coquitlam;
Replacing a missing stream awareness sign at Noons Creek and Panorama Drive, in Coquitlam;
Installing stream awareness signs at West Noons Creek at Panorama Drive, in Port Moody;
Investigate feasibility of possible fish habitat restoration and enhancement projects upstream from the Noons Creek hatchery site in the Noons Creek ravine between Heritage Mountain Boulevard Bridge and Panorama Drive in Coquitlam;
Investigate feasibility of possible fish habitat restoration and enhancement projects upstream from the Noons Creek hatchery site, in West Noons Creek, immediately below Deerwood Place bridge, in Port Moody and upstream in West Noons Creek to Panorama Drive in Port Moody and above Panorama Drive in West Noons Creek up to the BC Hydro Right-of-Way Service Road;
Removal of the cement culvert at West Noons Creek and Panorama Drive and installing a fish ladder on the downstream side and replacement with low-cost/no-cost and more fish friendly structures, in Port Moody;
Please note: The area of the west Noons Creek and Noons Creek watershed above and below Panorama Drive in Port Moody is of considerable concern, in view of the massive encroachment experienced already, into the riparian area/set-back along West Noons Creek at Panorama Drive in Port Moody.  Now the riparian zone has been reduced to less than 6 metres from top of West Noons Creek west side bank versus 15 meters to 30 meters now issued as guidelines.  To date, site remediation to fix this encroachment has been minimal.

Installing Stream Awareness signs at Cypress Lake and at the Cypress Lake Access Road and Noons Creek in Eagle Mountain Provincial Park;
Riparian Planting in the lower reaches and/or throughout the Noons Creek watershed;
…etc.

A list of possible and/or potential fish habitat restoration and enhancement projects in other nearby streams flowing into Port Moody Arm:

 

These include, among others, the following:

Suter Brook – continue daylighting and woody debris placement;
Hutchinson Creek;
Pigeon Creek – daylighting and complexing across IPSCO site, by developer;
Slaughterhouse Creek;
South Schoolhouse Creek – complexing lower reaches and removal and replacement of an old Deneil fish ladder;
Imperial Creek;
Hett Creek;
Wilkes Creek;
Turner Creek;
North Schoolhouse Creek;
…etc.

Broadly-based community partnerships are essential to completing fish habitat restoration projects.  The partners are project specific.  Partners support for various fish habitat restoration and enhancement projects is recognized on this web site and with on-site signage.

 

A list is also available of the fish habitat and enhancement projects already completed and the partners involved.  For example:  the stream awareness signs at Reichhold Ltd. and South Schoolhouse Creek, have 11 different groups logos on the two signs. One sign is on either side of the footbridge over the stream, at the end of the Short Street cul-de-sac where it meets the Trans Canada Trail.

 

 

 

 

 

To reach us:  Port Moody Ecological Society  300, Ioco Road  Port Moody, British Columbia, Canada  V3H 2V7  Phone and fax: (604) 469-9106